Saturday, November 11, 2017

A Civil War Quilt?



This quilt photo has found its way to several of those internet printing services that take images in the public domain and print them for you.
There's no information on the source or the history of the quilt. The caption reads:
"American-Civil-War-Coverlet-Pieced-and-Quilted-Calico-1860-"

Could it be an actual Civil War era quilt?


It shares design ideas with other patriotic quilts of the day, particularly this one from the collection of the Missouri Historical Society.
See more about the Hisorical Society's quilt here:
http://civilwarquilts.blogspot.com/2015/07/raffle-quilt-from-mississippi-valley.html

I've been looking for a source for about a year and have come up with nothing. Any ideas?

4 comments:

Denniele said...

No ideas but I do love it@!

Jaye Fish said...

There are 22 stars on the quilt. Alabama was the 22nd state, admitted in 1819. No idea if this has anything to do with the pattern.

Karen said...

Thank you for all you do for quilt history. I belong to my local guild in Greenville NC and one of our kind ladies looks at old quilts and gives us history and refers to books one of them being one of yours. I enjoy that part of the guild the most, more than the modern quilts and fabrics although they are beautiful too. We each have our likes that speak to our heart and mind. I need to ask you if you can think of a fabric that would go with your William Morris Earthly Paradise fabric. I have a layer cake and want to make a quilt for my brother who owns a early 1900's craftsman home and would like one piece of solid to go with your line. I do not have a quilt store. Perhaps I will end up purchasing more of the Earthly Paradise to use as sashing. Although a solid would be nice all of that loveliness of the Morris prints somehow might suit the wild abandon of his designs.

Barbara Brackman said...

Jaye---I never thought to count. That's a good observation, but I've found that the number of stars sometimes has more to do with what fits than the number of states. The style is more Civil War than 1819.